Free Fire is a film that asks the question “Remember the climax of Reservoir Dogs? What if just that?” It came out of nowhere with eye-popping promotional material, boasts a number of upper-B-list stars, and has the hottest indie production company on the block behind it, A24 (Moonlight, Green Room, The Lobster, every other movie your film buff friends busted a nut over last year). So, how’d it turn out?

Well, I definitely appreciate its premise. As I said earlier, it’s essentially one big climax: Shots are fired in the first half hour and the gunfight continues until the last minute of the film. It’s a great premise for a bottle film, dropping you into a scene and letting you explore the characters and their stories as you find them stuck in a high-intensity situation in an enclosed space. It also works really well as a general Quentin Tarantino send-up, borrowing elements from Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown, Kill Bill, and even Hateful Eight.

There’s just one problem: Ben Wheatley is not Quentin Tarantino. A big reason of why those films are all so iconic is because Tarantino is A) a brilliant writer and B) a master of suspense. There are a lot of great laughs in this movie, but the dialogue is just not as captivating as it needs to be to carry a 90-minute film that takes place in a single room. The gunfight too soon becomes a dull hum of gunfire when you don’t even know the characters yet.

Luckily, it gets better from there. This is one of the few action movies I’ve seen where the action wears thin at the beginning and then, very suddenly, becomes captivating. You start to get invested. You root for people. You’re excited by new developments. You laugh, harder and harder each time. One of the bigger surprises of this film is Armie Hammer, who plays by far his most endearing role to date. Brie Larson doesn’t get as much time as she needs, but you still find yourself rooting for her. Sharlto Copley is hilarious as always. It’s really a film that starts out disappointing and only gets better and better. It has perhaps the best ending in film so far this year.

It’s a very mathematical crime movie that also manages to emotionally invest its audience. It’s not perfect, but I still appreciate it a lot. I’ll give it an 87/100. I’m sorry I haven’t been doing as many reviews as I’d like. I have some rather potent thoughts on Power Rangers and Fate of the Furious (they’re both excellent films) but I couldn’t punch them out at the time. Hopefully I’ll be in a more prolific mood some time soon.

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